Green Energy Advice You Really Need To Know

Green energy is costly. It isn’t practical to go green. I can’t find the time to incorporate green energy. A lot of people also do not know where to start. Are you using these excuses? Read the following article and you will be able to start using green energy more and more in your own home.

When drawing up the landscaping plans for a garden path or patio, incorporate solar-powered lamps. These lamps require now power source, except the sun, and are generally inexpensive. This not only reduces energy costs, It also ensures that there is no need to wire lights outdoor.

Use curtains to assist you in keeping green. If it is summer and you want the room to stay cool, draw the curtains during the day so that the sun doesn’t shine in. If it’s winter, and you want the room to stay warm, open the curtains and let the sun into your room.

As you ready yourself to make the switch to green energy, try getting a step ahead of the game by decreasing your present energy needs. By using less energy, it will be that much easier to switch to alternative sources because you won’t be using as much. Good ways to start include using less light in your home, shortening hot showers and using cool instead of hot water for laundry.

For green energy use in your home, you should change all your incandescent bulbs to the new energy efficient fluorescent bulbs. Not only will you save a bundle on your energy bill, but you will help conserve energy for future generations and reduce your own impact on the power grid in your city.

Swap your old incandescent light bulbs for high-efficiency LED or compact fluorescent light bulbs. These bulbs use far less electricity than incandescent, and they come in sizes that fit most existing fixtures. While the up-front cost is generally higher, most of these bulbs will last for years before burning out.

Reverse the direction of the blades on your fan if you’d like to cut heating costs by as much as 10 percent! Although most people use fans for cooling, it’s possible to use them to suck cold air up and make your home feel much warmer without turning up the heat.

Measure the prevailing wind speed on your property before considering a wind generator. In order for wind energy to be cost-effective, you need a wind speed greater than 8.5 to 9 MPH at least sixty percent of the time. Any slower, and the turbine won’t spin fast enough to generate much electricity.

The average washing machine uses a lot of hot water. It can use over 30 gallons each load. Cut down on its hot water usage by washing in cold water. Many people struggle with this because they insist on having the water warm. If you’re one of them, try replacing your machine with an Energy Star unit. Many modern detergents clean clothes really well at low temperatures.

If there is running water on your property, you should consider investing in a good hydro-power solution. A simple mill can turn into an energy generator. Get in touch with Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to find out if your stream is strong enough to produce a significant amount of power.

You do not have to leave your electronics behind to live a green lifestyle. Recharge your electronics with solar chargers and you no longer have to be concerned with your electronics being a drain on the environment. It is a small investment that pays off quickly in electric bills and a guilt-free conscience.

Spend time in order to learn the difference between passive and active solar power. Active power can be stored for later use. Passive power must be utilized more quickly but no expensive storage cells are required. Active solar power requires a lot of involvement in the form of installation, mechanics, and power cells. Passive power uses the sun for thermal energy in the home.

To incorporate green energy into your life, heat your home using biofuel instead of traditional fuels. This way, you can heat your home using renewable, biodegradable and generally, more environmentally friendly energy fairly easily. A wood or pellet stove is a great way to heat your home using biofuel products.

Share rides with others in your neighborhood to greatly reduce your fuel usage. If you have children, organize a carpooling system with your neighbors and trade off driving days among all the participating parents. If you are near friends and family, go food shopping together and take turns driving.

Now that you know what it takes to use green energy in your own home, forget all of the excuses you were using before. Take this article and put the information from it to use. You’ll find that there are so many benefits, from saving money on bills to making money on extra energy, well within your reach!

5 thoughts on “Green Energy Advice You Really Need To Know”

  1. Self generating clothes washing machines are a great way to go green. They only require enough electricity to get going, but once they are moving, they generate enough electricity to complete the load. They also only use the amount of water necessary to wash the exact amount of clothes in the washer for that load.

  2. Measure the prevailing wind speed on your property before considering a wind generator. In order for wind energy to be cost-effective, you need a wind speed greater than 8.5 to 9 MPH at least sixty percent of the time. Any slower, and the turbine won’t spin fast enough to generate much electricity.

  3. Harness wind power in your home. Wind power is probably one of the cleanest sources that we have available now, and using it just might cut your electric bill down by up to 90%. You will have to make sure that your home is zoned correctly and then invest in a wind-turbine unit in order to take advantage of this technology.

  4. Only a small percentage of older homes are insulated. It will require an initial investment, but it will cost you much less to heat and cool your home every month afterward. Your heating and cooling system will run much more efficiently, and you will surely reap the benefits for years to come.

  5. Try heating your home with a wood pellet stove. The pellets burned in a pellet stove are made of highly compact sawdust. They burn so cleanly than they are not required to get an EPA certification for emissions. Be aware, however, that the cost of the pellets may be high in some areas.

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